Press Release: Three Arrested Attempting to Block Fast-Tracked FERC Commissioner Approvals

Image may contain: 8 people, wedding and indoor

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Jimmy Betts, info@BeyondExtremeEnergy.org, 515-708-2463

Three Arrested Attempting to Block Fast-Tracked FERC Commissioner Approvals

WASHINGTON, DC: The week following Trump’s announcement that he will pull the United States out of the Paris Climate Accord, three individuals representing a coalition of nearly 170 groups opposing Trump’s nominees to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) disrupted a committee vote to advance the candidates. Three individuals were arrested during the committee vote.  They stood up and spoke out about FERC’s abusive practices and disregard for the environment.

The coalition, made up of local and national groups focused on various issues, is demanding that senators vote no on Trump’s nominations until the Senate holds investigations into FERC’s the abuses of power and law. The campaign has been building for more than five months and has included call-in’s, letter-writing drives, Twitter storms, lobby days, and civil resistance focused on educating senators and pressuring them to oppose the nominations. The coalition has extensive documentation of FERC’s abuses of power and law to back up their demands.

So far, the Senate has showed an unwillingness to protect the public from pollution, climate change, and eminent domain seizures of land that result from FERC’s mandate to rubber stamp fracked-gas infrastructure. Now that Trump is pulling the United States out of the Paris Climate Accord, the coalition says it’s even more unacceptable for senators to approve Trump’s nominations, one of whom, Mitch McConnell energy staffer Neil Chatterjee, is a climate denier.

This disruption followed a similar one the coalition carried out two weeks ago when the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources  met to question Trump’s nominees. The coalition has vowed to continue the fight to Resist FERC and the abusive, exploitative world it represents and perpetuates.  

“As a New York City resident I am outraged by FERC,” said Jess Rechtschaffer, who was arrested this morning. ”It is criminal that that FERC approves wholesale land grabs so that the fossil fuel industry can install pipelines via eminent domain in the vicinity of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Plant.  FERC has never seen a dirty energy project they didn’t like from the Dakotas to NY.”

“FERC approves fossil fuel infrastructure; fossil fuels worsen climate change; the world loses and the fossil fuel industry profits. The Senate needs to overhaul FERC.” said Sid Madison from New Jersey, also arrested this morning for disrupting the vote to call attention to FERC practices.

“Climate leaders don’t support fracking or fracking infrastructure buildout, and true conservatives don’t support eminent domain for corporate gain,” said Ted Glick, an organizer with Beyond Extreme Energy and another who was arrested for disrupting the committee vote. “Senators should vote no on both of Trump’s FERC nominees, big supporters of 20th century energy sources in the 17th year of the 21st century. We need a Federal Renewable Energy Agency, not a fossil fuel industry-controlled FERC.”

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https://beyondextremeenergy.org/2017/06/06/press-release-three-arrested-attempting-to-block-fast-tracked-ferc-commissioner-approvals

Images & Video from this action (check for updated content throughout the day):

https://drive.google.com/folderview?id=0B9au4UKSykxhN2ZxSnUtSTI5aEk

 

Call-Out for LTE’s on Upcoming FERC Vote in the Senate!

The more we can throw FERC into the limelight and put our senators on the spot for their unacceptable acceptance of business as usual, the better. To that end, please take a few moments this week to submit a Letter to the Editor (LTE) to your local paper regarding the FERC Vacancies Campaign.

Todd Larsen from Green America provided the FERC Vacancies Coalition with advice and a template for writing an LTE in opposition to Trump’s FERC nominations. Please take a look at the below material, and consider sending in your own LTE to local press outlets.

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This advice from the Union of Concerned Scientists is helpful:  http://www.ucsusa.org/action/writing-an-lte.html#.WNfI-jvyvIU

It is best to write in response to an article that was run in the paper/new source and reference that article in the first sentence, keep the LTE short (200 words is ideal and no more than 300), and provide full contact info at the end.

TEMPLATE LETTER

[Insert leading sentence or two regarding a previous article or connecting your letter to local interests/recent events]. As early as next week, the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources could vote to approve climate denier Neil Chatterjee and friend of the industry Robert Powelson to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the most powerful agency many people are likely to know little or nothing about. This agency is responsible for rubber stamping fracked gas pipelines and infrastructure projects that damage the land, air, and drinking water of communities nationwide, as well as the global climate. In the past 30 years, FERC has sided with the fossil fuel industry repeatedly and has rejected only one pipeline. Currently, FERC only has two commissioners and thus lacks a quorum, preventing the agency from approving new projects. That’s why nearly 170 organizations nationwide are using this moment to demand that the Senate reject both Chatterjee and Powelson, and thereby prevent FERC’s approval of any more pipelines until Congress holds hearings on the agency’s pro-industry bias and refusal to listen to the legitimate concerns of communities. Congress needs to take steps to replace FERC with an agency dedicated to a just transition off fossil fuels. Holding hearings would be a first step. Senators [XX and XX – of your state] need to take a strong stand to oppose Chatterjee and Powelson. Let’s call our senators and make sure they know we want them to vote no!

FULL NAME
ADDRESS
CONTACT EMAIL
CONTACT PHONE

(Newspapers will need to contact you to ensure that you actually wrote the LTE and approve of publication.  They may also want to edit the piece and run edits by you)

No Fireworks for FERC Nominees at Senate Hearing

By Rich Heidorn Jr. and Michael Brooks
(https://www.rtoinsider.com/ferc-powelson-chatterjee-senate-hearing-43512/)

WASHINGTON — Pennsylvania regulator Robert Powelson and Neil Chatterjee, senior energy policy adviser to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), received a mostly friendly reception Thursday at their Senate confirmation hearings to fill two Republican vacancies on FERC.

Aside from several interruptions by anti-pipeline activists, the two-hour hearing before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee was largely uneventful with no obvious stumbles by the nominees nor attacks by senators.

The tenor of the hearing suggested Powelson and Chatterjee should have no problem winning confirmation in the Republican-controlled Senate to restore the commission’s quorum, which was lost in February with the resignation of former Chairman Norman Bay.

ferc chatterjee powelson

Powelson and Chatterjee, who are seeking terms expiring in 2020 and 2021, respectively, testified along with Dan Brouillette, President Trump’s nominee to be deputy secretary of energy.

ferc powelson chatterjee

Each nimbly tap danced in response to questions on senators’ pet concerns — favored Department of Energy labs, pipeline and hydro projects, state incentives to save nuclear generation, the fate of the Yucca Mountain nuclear waste depository — promising to consider the issues but not committing themselves to positions.

Chair Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska) pledged at the end of the hearing to bring the nominees to a committee vote quickly after they answer any written questions from the senators. “My hope is to be able to advance your names quickly, along with that of [nominee for Interior Department deputy secretary, David Bernhardt], so that we can process these nominees for the FERC, for DOE, for DOI and allow the business to proceed.”

Mild Tone

The mild tone of the questions was a stark contrast to the grilling Bay — a Democrat and former prosecutor — received at his confirmation hearing in 2014, when Republicans attacked his record as chief of FERC enforcement. (See LaFleur Cruises, Bay Bruises in Confirmation Hearing.)

That’s not to say the hearing was devoid of partisanship.

Murkowski blamed Bay for resigning and former President Obama for refusing to fill Republican vacancies on the commission last year (a response to the Senate’s refusal to consider Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland). “As a result of those factors, this is the first time in 40 years that FERC has lacked a quorum.”

Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), sitting in for ranking member Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), countered that Bay had informed the Trump transition team he would resign if replaced as chair. He noted it took Trump three months to name nominees.

Franken also took the opportunity to criticize Trump’s proposed Energy Department budget cuts and its rollback of the Obama administration’s clean energy and climate policies.

“Both the Department of Energy and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission can play a key role in the clean energy revolution, or they can hold us back while our international competitors reap the rewards,” he said. “That is the prism through which I will consider the nominees that we hear from today.”

Later, in response to Franken’s question about what needs to be done to allow distributed energy technologies to participate in the markets, Chatterjee pledged: “I’m in favor of markets. I’m in favor of competition. And I’m in favor of technology, particularly technologies of interest to consumers.”

Climate Change Question

Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.) asked the nominees whether they believed in manmade climate change.

ferc powelson chatterjee

“I’m not a climate denier,” Powelson responded, adding that “market-based solutions” were adding natural gas and renewables and reducing carbon emissions in Pennsylvania.

Chatterjee — who was central in McConnell’s fight against the EPA Clean Power Plan — said he would insist that any policy to cut carbon emissions not undermine the grid. “The first issue at FERC is to oversee reliability. I think that any policy … that seeks to mitigate carbon emissions, we have to ensure that it not have a negative impact on reliability,” he said.

“The climate is changing and we’re all living here, so it must have some impact,” Brouillette said.

Duckworth also asked the FERC nominees for their position on state energy initiatives, such as Illinois’ zero-emission credits for nuclear plants.

“I’m a state’s rights individual,” said Powelson, adding that “nuclear power is part of our energy mix and we’re going to need it.”

Chatterjee also promised “I believe in state’s rights.”

A Plug for Coal

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.Va.) made his case for a continued role for coal in the nation’s generation portfolio, saying it is an essential part of “baseload power. “All that we’re asking for is a proper mix,” he said. “I’m being told by the utility companies the proper mix isn’t being enforced because of certain conditions and certain requirements that the previous FERC has put on them.

“There’s going to be a fuel of the future, I’m sure in 10 to 20, 30 years from now,” he continued. “But right now we have to use — in the cleanest fashion we can — what we have that we can depend on.”

Responding to Sen. Martin Heinrich’s (D-N.M.) question about the commission’s role in transmission development,   Powelson said if confirmed, he wanted to “immediately sit down with our regional transmission organizations and independent system operators and see where the bottlenecks are, what’s working and what’s not working.”

PURPA

Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.) asked the FERC nominees for their views of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, passed in the aftermath of the 1973 oil crisis.

Powelson called PURPA “a 1978 vintage document. It was addressing a scarcity issue … and the generation mix has changed today.” He promised to look at “what’s working with PURPA and what’s not” if confirmed.

“But I say this respectfully, a Congressional review of PURPA — a PURPA 2.0 doctrine — might be part of a potential energy bill.”

Chatterjee echoed Powelson’s sentiments. “Any major changes to PURPA would be made by Congress, and while you have my assurance I would work very seriously on this issue should I be confirmed, I think any major changes need to come from this body and not from FERC,” he said.

Paths to FERC

Powelson, a member of the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission, is the current president of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners — a familiar stepping stone for FERC commissioners. “What I learned from my experience at NARUC is what works in Pennsylvania might not work in other jurisdictions and the proud appreciation we each have for our individual states’ rights in supporting our states’ energy policies,” he said in his opening remarks.

Chatterjee, a former lobbyist for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, became McConnell’s energy adviser in 2011 after working for two years as a staff aide for the coal state senator. Noting the tradition of bipartisanship and consensus at the commission, he touted his ability to convince and compromise with Democratic senators in pushing through legislation.

“We call Neil ‘the Boxer whisperer’ in my office — a term of endearment, I assure you,” McConnell told the committee in his introduction, referring to Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.). “His work was key in forging alliances between Sen. Boxer, myself … and others that ultimately resulted in bipartisan agreement.”

Franken said Trump should quickly fill the remaining Republican vacancy and nominate a Democrat to replace Commissioner Colette Honorable, who announced she would not seek a new term when hers expires in June.

Numerous reports have identified Kevin McIntyre, co-head of the energy practice at law firm Jones Day, as the third Republican nominee and likely chairman.

“It is important that we restore the quorum at this commission. But it is equally important that the president nominate two more members to fill the remaining vacancies — one a Democrat, and one Republican — and maintain the party balance that the law requires,” Franken said.

Protest Disruptions

The hearing was interrupted several times by protesters from environmental group Beyond Extreme Energy, who chanted “FERC hurts families” and “Shut FERC down.” The group has used the same modus operandi to disrupt FERC open meetings.

Police removed and arrested four protesters, including Lee Stewart, who had tied himself to a chair and had to be carried out along with it. “Until Congress investigates the agency’s abuses of power and law, the Senate must not approve new FERC commissioners,” the group said in a statement.

At the end of the hearing, Murkowski praised the nominees’ young children, who sat with their mothers in the front row. “You’ve been extraordinarily well behaved,” she said in an apparent dig at the protesters. “I think you set a fine example for grownups.”

Press Release: FIVE PROTESTERS DISRUPT FERC COMMISSIONER HEARING

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Jimmy Betts, 515-708-2463, info@beyondextremeenergy.org 

lee getting arrested

Lee Stewart is dragged out of the hearing room.

 

FIVE PROTESTERS DISRUPT FERC COMMISSIONER HEARING

Four people arrested.  Hearing disrupted for 20 minutes.

WASHINGTON, DC – Once accustomed to operating in the shadows, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and its controversial role in permitting harmful and unnecessary fracked-gas infrastructure was thrown into the limelight on Thursday morning when five people disrupted the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee’s confirmation hearing for President Trump’s nominations to the Commission, causing delay while speakers tried to proceed.  After the hearing was called to order, and introductions occurred, protesters methodically, yet unpredictably, loudly exclaimed  “FERC hurts families, Shut FERC down!” and “FERC hurts families, FERC hurt towns” and “The future is watching”. One protester said “I am compelled to interrupt this because I have seen the damage of climate change”. The protesters were ejected, four arrested and one detained. FERC has been debilitated since January when Commissioner Norman Bay resigned and left the Commission without the quorum of three it needs to issue permits. Protesters also spoke out: “FERC is killing Pennsylvanians.”  

The disrupters represent a coalition of more than 160 organizations that have pledged to fight Trump’s nominations to FERC. Their message is simple: Until Congress investigates the agency’s abuses of power and law, the Senate must not approve new FERC Commissioners. Until now, their opposition has come in the form of call-in’s, letter-writing campaigns, and lobby days focused on educating the Senators and pressuring Senators to vote against all of Trump’s FERC nominees. The coalition has extensive documentation of FERC’s abuses of power and law and has presented it to the Senators over the last few months. Thursday’s action marked an escalation in the campaign. In addition to delaying a restoration of FERC’s quorum for as long as possible, the action was meant to show the increasingly potent political consequences if the Senate allows FERC to continue hurting communities, the environment, and global climate.

“FERC is an arm of the oil and gas industries,” said Lee Stewart, an organizer with Beyond Extreme Energy and one of those arrested in the hearing room. “Their rubber-stamping of fracked gas permits disregards the harms such projects inflict on communities, towns, and the climate. Because of the great violence FERC inflicts on the world, it’s important to do everything possible to stop or delay them. Until FERC is replaced with an agency dedicated to a just transition off fossil fuels and to an exploitation-free energy system based on localized, renewable energy, business as usual is unacceptable.”

Randy Fenstermacher of Massachusetts said, “History will show that the oil crisis of the 1970’s led to the evolution of FERC in its current state, and pales in comparison to abrupt global climate change already underway.  We need a new organization of the energy sector.  To Congress, we say, ‘Don’t nominate, innovate.’  FERC is not positioned to transition to renewable, non-exploitative systems of localized energy generation.”  

ACTION IMAGES & VIDEOS:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B9au4UKSykxhNnlYd2FRWDlhWXM

 

Post ‘jihad’ kerfuffle, regulator aims to step into spotlight

Sam Mintz, E&E News reporter
Published: Wednesday, May 17, 2017
https://www.eenews.net/greenwire/2017/05/17/stories/1060054674

President Trump has nominated National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners President Robert Powelson to serve as a member of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

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Photo courtesy of @NARUC via Twitter.

Pennsylvania Public Utility Commissioner Robert Powelson has a similar style to President Trump.

Powelson, who last week was nominated by Trump to serve on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, is not afraid to speak his mind, even if it means veering into politically incorrect territory, like when he said in March that pipeline opponents were engaged in a “jihad.”

He’s also OK with standing up to (and putting down) more established political figures, such as when he criticized New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (D) for his state’s cautious approach on pipeline permitting or Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) for his support of a hydraulic fracturing ban.

But under the brash approach is an intelligent, well-qualified regulator who has aspired to leadership roles at every step in his career, say friends and supporters.

Powelson got his start working at chambers of commerce in Pennsylvania, first the Delaware County Chamber and then Chester County’s. After 14 years as president and CEO at the latter, he was nominated by Democratic Gov. Ed Rendell to the Public Utility Commission in 2008. He led the PUC as chairman for four years under Republican Gov. Tom Corbett.

He is also the current president of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, a position that has served as a pipeline to the federal commission in recent years. If confirmed, Powelson would be the third NARUC president to move to FERC since 2012.

Powelson is not a fan of the Clean Power Plan and instead favors “market-based decarbonization,” which he says has been responsible for power plant emission reductions in Pennsylvania. He is an advocate for states’ rights and supports an “all of the above,” hybrid approach to energy generation.

Another area of similarity between Powelson and Trump is that Powelson is willing to talk about and advocate for less popular approaches that might challenge conventional wisdom.

An example is when he expressed support in 2015 for decoupling, or separating utilities’ electricity sales from their revenues. The idea is to remove disincentives for utilities to encourage conservation and energy efficiency measures, which under the traditional system would decrease sales — and revenues. In a decoupled system, utilities could structure their rates to reflect the actual cost of maintaining infrastructure, rather than on how much electricity customers take from the grid.

The practice has been supported by environmentalists but is generally opposed by consumer advocates and utilities and has been adopted in some form in 23 states — but not Pennsylvania.

“Personally, I think PA needs to come out of the stone ages here,” he told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette in 2015.

‘Extremely pro-natural gas’

Despite his openness to innovation, Powelson is seen by some in Pennsylvania, which one observer called a “very pro-industry state when it comes to the regulatory system,” as overly friendly to the companies he has been tasked with regulating.

“He is extremely pro-natural gas, to the point where I have to question whether he would be objective enough to really sort of look at the harm that is done by various natural gas infrastructure proposals,” said Joe Minott, executive director of the Philadelphia-based Clean Air Council.

“His jihadist comment, I think, is an excellent reflection of how he sees any opposition to moving ahead with natural gas. He’s the epitome of Sarah Palin’s ‘drill, baby, drill,'” Minott said.

Speaking to gas industry representatives at Pennsylvania’s Upstream PA conference March 21, Powelson made the “jihad” comment in reference to anti-pipeline activists who had picketed the homes of FERC commissioners in 2016, according to StateImpact.

“The jihad has begun,” he said. “At the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, groups actually show up at commissioners’ homes to make sure we don’t get this gas to market. How irresponsible is that?”

Powelson later acknowledged his choice of words was inappropriate.

But the incident remains a jarring symbol for people like Lynda Farrell, who directs the Pipeline Safety Coalition in Pennsylvania.

“I would say anyone who characterizes landowners and civilians seeking to protect their rights and their quality of life as jihadists should not serve in public office,” she said. “You don’t make that kind of a statement as a slip of the tongue.”

Supporters of Powelson disagree with that characterization.

“Looking at one flash in time I don’t think is a fair analysis of Rob. There are plenty of times where he has spoken out clearly and candidly and critically of industry, the people that we’re regulating,” said John Coleman, who has served with Powelson on the Pennsylvania PUC since 2010.

“In his view, if you’re violating what he sees as the rules of engagement, you’re going to hear from him,” Coleman said.

From NARUC to FERC

Unlike Kevin McIntyre, a likely pick to lead the energy regulatory agency whose Jones Day colleague Don McGahn worked on the Trump campaign and landed a key job as White House counsel, Powelson does not appear to have concrete personal ties to the president.

He also does not have the congressional connections that fellow nominee Neil Chatterjee, a longtime energy aide to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), can use as the confirmation process advances.

It’s possible Powelson caught the attention of the White House during the transition. NARUC leaders had what he called an “intense dialogue” with the administration’s transition team, in the form of a call with Trump’s energy transition leader, American Energy Alliance President Thomas Pyle (Energywire, Feb 1).

In the call and a follow-up letter to Pyle, Powelson emphasized updates to infrastructure and called on the president to reduce “federal overreach” on energy issues including generation resource allocation, net metering and electric transmission siting authority.

The emphasis on states’ rights is an important one to Powelson and others he has worked with, some of whom are celebrating the potential addition of a state regulator to the federal body.

“We always want to make sure that FERC appreciates what we believe as a policy matter are firmly within our purview as state officials and state regulators,” said Richard Mroz, president of the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities.

“Sometimes a particular state perspective can get lost in very complex issues, with a lot of intervenors, a lot of parties. I just think it’s good to know that someone there, a commissioner, will still be mindful of what is important to state commissions and ultimately to the consumers in our states,” Mroz said.

Kevin Hughes, chairman of the Maryland Public Service Commission, said Powelson has “a keen appreciation for the role and responsibility of states to ensure that their citizens have access to reliable and affordable power.”

Powelson said in February that he thought state regulators would take leadership roles as Trump appointees in agencies. In one case, at least, that prediction was prescient.

In another interview, Powelson said he saw a “very clear edict” in his dealings with the Trump administration. “We’re going to invest in infrastructure, and we are going to do it in a very efficient manner, and with respect to environmental protection, obviously,” he said.

The overlap between his priorities and Trump’s is likely not coincidental, some observers say.

“I had heard that he was lobbying pretty hard for this. I think he was able to persuade the Trump administration that he was able to reflect their values when it comes to regulating,” said Minott.

Twitter: @samjmintz Email: smintz@eenews.net

Coalition urges confirmation delay, Trump investigation

Hannah Northey, E&E News reporter
Published: Monday, May 15, 2017
https://www.eenews.net/eenewspm/2017/05/15/stories/1060054570

Environmentalists want the Senate to delay confirmation hearings for vacant Federal Energy Regulatory Commission posts until President Trump’s business ties and former FBI Director James Comey’s firing are investigated.

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Photo by Ryan McKnight, courtesy of Flickr.

More than 160 groups opposing President Trump’s nominations for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission called today for delaying Senate confirmation hearings while lawmakers probe the president’s potential conflicts of interest and ties to foreign governments.

“President Trump’s unknown personal and professional ties with foreign leaders and foreign corporations raise serious and legitimate concerns for those he would seek to install in these highly consequential positions,” a number of groups, including the newly formed “FERC Vacancies Campaign,” wrote to Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairwoman Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska). Also signing the letter were Green America, the Delaware Riverkeeper Network and Beyond Extreme Energy.

The groups, which are also meeting with members of the Senate panel next week, argue that Trump’s FERC picks — Neil Chatterjee, a top energy aide for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), and Pennsylvania regulator Robert Powelson — could be subject to “behind-the-scenes pressure” from the president.

FERC is led by acting Chairwoman Cheryl LaFleur and Colette Honorable, both Democrats, who have been unable to make high-profile decisions since former FERC Chairman Norman Bay abruptly left in February, depriving the five-seat commission of a quorum.

“FERC’s role in protecting the U.S. energy grid is essential to our national security,” the groups told Murkowski. “Recent events regarding President Trump’s firing of FBI Director Comey, including his apparent demand for loyalty in how the Director carried out his decision making and activities as head of the FBI, heightens our alarm and concern.”

Their letter is part of a broader effort to align FERC critics with bipartisan fallout Trump is facing after the firing last week of FBI Director James Comey. On NBC’s “Meet the Press” yesterday, Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) urged the president to stop talking or tweeting about the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election and allow the inquiry to move forward.

In their letter, the groups demanded Chatterjee and Powelson’s confirmation hearing be delayed until a hearing is held to investigate “multiple and documented reports” of what they say amounts to FERC misusing its authority to block challenges to federal pipeline approvals, rushing environmental assessments and unfairly granting eminent domain.

Delaware Riverkeeper has made similar arguments in court. In April, the group filed an appeal at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, challenging a lower court’s decision to toss a lawsuit against FERC for its alleged bias toward approving pipelines (Energywire, April 21).

Despite calls for a delay in FERC confirmations, Murkowski last week said she’ll move “as quick as possible” to restore FERC’s quorum.

And Sen. Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), the panel’s ranking member, said last week that she was unfamiliar with Powelson but planned to research his background. Cantwell also said she’d already had a brief conversation about “market manipulation” with Chatterjee. The FERC nominee had also helped Cantwell and Murkowski navigate energy conference talks with the House last year, the senator said.

Ted Glick, a member of Beyond Extreme Energy, acknowledged calls for a delay may not stick given the bipartisan push to re-establish FERC’s quorum and the agency’s ability to make high-profile decisions.

“We know it’s a long shot, we’re not stupid,” Glick said. “We also know it’s the right thing to do. Sooner or later, you start winning victories.”

Reporter Geof Koss contributed.

Twitter: @HMNorthey Email: hnorthey@eenews.net

The Senate Committee on Energy & Natural Resources Needs Your Phone Call Now!

Urgent – the Senate Committee on Energy & Natural Resources Needs Your Phone Call …Now!

They are planning to schedule hearings that would install Donald Trump Nominees at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC).

FERC is notorious for abusing its legal authority and peoples’ rights.

e.g. FERC routinely strips people of their legal right to challenge pipeline projects until it is too late – until property rights have been stripped, forests cut, and people are forced to live next to explosive fracked gas pipelines and compressors.

Right Now, FERC Can’t Approve Any Fracked Gas Pipelines or LNG Export Facilities Because they Don’t have the Legal Quorum Necessary to Cast Binding Votes. We need to keep it that way.

And we certainly don’t want a Donald Trump appointee, with a 5 year term, who will be expected to be loyal to a President with unknown business ties to nations and companies around the world.

Remember – this is not a political issue – this is a people issue.

Don’t’ let anyone suggest to you otherwise.

Call Your Two Senators & Then 3 Members of the Senate Committee

Simply Say:

  1. I am calling to urge the Senator to oppose hearings on the President’s nominations for the vacant FERC Commissioner Seats.
  2. Instead I want the Senator to make it his/her/their top priority to hold hearings into the abuses of power and law being experienced by communities across this nation at the hands of FERC and to identify needed reforms.
  3. Without hearings and reforms FERC will continue to abuse its power and the health, safety and welfare of all decent people here in America.
  4. Installing Commissioners advanced by a President with business interests around the world that conflict with good decision-making and energy policy here in the U.S., particularly one that demands loyalty to himself from his agency heads, is a serious national security risk.

Don’t know your Senators phone number? Find it here: https://www.senate.gov/senators/contact/senators_cfm.cfm?State=MA

The Members of the Senate Committee on Energy & Natural Resources are:

Democrats:

Senator Maria Cantwell, Minority Ranking Member: 202 224 3441

Senator Bernie Sanders: 202 224 5141

Senator Al Franken: 202 224 5641

Senator Ron Wyden: 202 224 5244

Senator Debbie Stabenow: 202 224 4822

Senator Angus King: 202 224 5344

Senator Mazie Hirono: 202 224 6361

Senator Tammy Duckworth: 202 224 2854

Senator Catherine Cortez Masto: 202 224 3542

Senator Joe Manchin: 202 224 3954

Senator Martin Heinrich: 202 224 5521

Republicans:

Senator Lisa Murkowski, Chair: 202 224 6665

Senator Rob Portman: 202 224 3353

Senator John Barrasso: 202 224 6441

Senator James Risch: 202 224 2752

Senator Mike Lee: 202 224 5444

Senator Jeff Flake: 202 224 4521

Senator Steve Daines: 202 224 2651

Senator Cory Gardner: 202 224 5941

Senator Lamar Alexander: 202 224 4944

Senator John Hoeven: 202 224 2551

Senator Bill Cassidy: 202 224 5824

Senator Luther Strange: 202 224 4124

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Thanks to Maya van Rossum and the Delaware Riverkeeper Network for putting together this call-in.